Do your finances reflect your priorities?

When people spend most of their money on things that are important to them, they feel more satisfied and fulfilled with their lives.

It’s easier to stick to a financial plan when it gets you closer to what you really want out of life. 

Life’s priorities are different for everyone, so it’s important to know what means the most to you. Take the time to determine what is important to you and what will make you the happiest.

To determine whether your finances reflect your priorities, take the following steps:

  1. List your priorities. They may range from things you need to survive, such as having a place to live and food to eat, to things you want, such as charity, travel, or education.
  2. List how you spend your money. You likely spend a lot of money meeting basic needs, but what about the rest? Be sure to use actual bank statements and receipts for this step. You may be surprised to find that you’re not actually spending where you think it is.
  3. Compare your lists. Look for areas where there is a disconnect between what matters to you and what you spend your money on.  Do you spend so much money on debts that there’s nothing left for things you’d like to do? Are you wasting money on areas that don’t provide fulfillment?
  4. Create a budget and adjust your spending.  Make your money go towards things that are truly important to you. Spend less on the things that aren’t fulfilling in your life, and put more money towards the things that are.

You’ll feel the difference when your spending aligns with your priorities.

If you are carrying a heavy debt burden that is keeping you from spending money on the things that are most important to you, call Harris-Courage & Grady. We can help you create a plan to eliminate your debts and get a fresh financial start.


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