Six Tips for Getting a Raise

Who doesn’t need more money?

Most of our clients come to see us when money is tight. A raise can help relieve the financial stress you’re experiencing, although you still may need a bankruptcy to get rid of your excess debt.

Here are some tips to help you negotiate your next raise.

  1. Have a target amount in mind. Don’t just walk into your boss’s office and ask for a raise. Do some research. What do your coworkers make? What about people doing similar work at other companies? Taking time to do research will strengthen your case for why you deserve more.
  2. Justify the raise. Think about what you’ve accomplished at your job since your last raise. Have you learned a new skill, or made some other contribution to the company? Be able to tell your employer about what has changed to cause you to deserve more than the salary you originally agreed to.
  3. Schedule your meeting. Tell your boss that you’d like to have a discussion about your career path, and set a time. This will allow you and your boss to prepare for the meeting. It also shows professionalism and that you value your boss’s time.
  4. Find a friend and practice asking for a raise. Think about what you’ll say. Ask for your friend’s feedback, and then practice again. The more comfortable you are with what you’re asking, the better the real conversation will go.
  5. Meet with your boss. Once you know how much of a raise you’d like and you have practiced, you’re ready to ask for your raise. Be prepared to justify the amount you’re asking for. Discuss your future plans with the company.
  6. Stay positive. Most bosses don’t respond well to threats. Keep the tone of your conversation positive, and don’t threaten to leave. Even if you don’t get the raise you ask for immediately, a positive conversation now could lead to a raise in the future.

When you meet with your boss, be assertive and ask for what you deserve. Come prepared and present your case confidently. The better prepared you are, the easier you will make it for your boss to say “yes!”


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